Do You Really Need to Lose Weight?

7 questions that can help you decide.
By Dulce Zamora
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Charlotte E. Grayson Mathis, MD

So your favorite jeans have gotten a bit too close-fitting for comfort. Maybe you don't cut quite the figure in your bathing suit that you did a few years ago.

But do you really need to lose weight? Are you putting your health in danger -- or just carrying around a little harmless extra padding?

The standard answer is that you're overweight if your body mass index (BMI) is 25 or higher and obese if your BMI is 30 or higher. But some new research is confusing the weight-and-health issue a bit.

A study published in the April 20 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that people whose BMIs put them into the overweight category actually had a lower risk of death than people in the normal-weight group. (People who were considered obese still had an increased risk of death.)

"When we looked at the overweight group รข€¦ we found that that group was associated with fewer than the expected number of deaths," says study author David F. Williamson, PhD, senior epidemiologist at the Diabetes Division of the CDC. Does that mean that if you're overweight, but not obese, you should quit worrying about dropping the extra pounds? Experts who spoke to WebMD gave us some answers -- along with seven questions you should ask yourself.

* What is your lifestyle? Regular physical activity and healthy eating are important, no matter what your weight or your BMI.
* What is your family history? If a close relative has a history of high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, or other weight-related ailment, it's crucial to be mindful of your weight.
* What is your weight history? People who have consistently gained weight over the years need be careful. Experts say your BMI should not increase dramatically, even as you age. Even moderate weight gain in adulthood can increase your risk of diabetes.
* How is your weight distributed? Weight gained above the hips -- the so-called "apple" shape -- can be problematic. In both men and women, bigger abdomens can signal trouble.
* What is your waist size? The National Institutes of Health has determined that a waist circumference of over 40 inches in men and over 35 inches in women signifies a health risk, particularly in people with BMIs of 25-34.9 (the overweight category). Clothing size is not a good indicator of weight or health, since sizes vary with different manufacturers. But you can use your own clothing -- maybe a favorite pair of pants -- as a personal gauge of your weight.
* What is your health profile? If your cholesterol and blood pressure levels are high and your BMI falls into the overweight or obese category, it's important to lose weight. If your BMI is in the high end of healthy or in the low overweight range, it's a good idea to talk to your doctor about whether weight loss is right for you.
* How do you feel? Seriously consider weight loss if you are overweight and have joint problems, shortness of breath, or other health troubles that limit your day-to-day living.

The 10 Nutrition Rules of Weight Loss

WebMD Feature from "Runner's World" Magazine

By Nancy Clark

Nutritionist Nancy Clark shares ten tips every runner should know if they want to lose some weight.

1. To lose 10 pounds of body fat a year, you need to eat 100 calories less per day. Cutting too many calories from your daily intake will sap your energy level and increase your hunger, making you more susceptible to splurging on high-calorie foods.

2. Don't skip breakfast. Eat within two hours of waking.

3. In fact, eat more breakfast than you think you should. Trade in some of your dinner calories for more calories at breakfast.

4. Don't allow yourself to get hungry. Eat at least every four hours, and split a meal in half to make sure you properly fuel up pre- and postrun. For example, eat part of your breakfast before your morning run (a banana) and the rest of your breakfast afterward (a bagel with peanut butter).

5. Eat at least three kinds of food each meal from these four categories: breads, cereals, and grains; fruits and vegetables; low-fat dairy and soy; and lean meats, fish, and nuts. Breads, cereals, and grains should be the foundation of each meal, with protein as an accompaniment.

6. Shoot for a gradual loss of body fat. You're more likely to put the weight back on (and more) if you drop weight too quickly.

7. Liquid calories add up fast and can lead to weight gain. Minimize the amount of sodas, juices, store-bought smoothies, sports drinks, coffee drinks, and alcohol you consume.

8. Eat closer to the earth, enjoying fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Minimize the amount of processed foods you eat; they tend to offer less fiber and are less satiating.

9. If you can't resist fast food, ask for nutritional information before you make your choices (or check in advance via restaurant Web sites). Avoid any menu items with the words "fried," "crispy," and "special sauce," which are guaranteed to be high calorie.

10. Remember that the calories in the energy bars, sports drinks, and gels you consume during a run add up, even though you're running. Consume them only as needed.

Originally published on March 1, 2008
Custom Search

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails

HEALTH TIPS QUICK INFO

How to burn off belly fat

Get here: Burn The Fat, Feed The Muscle or
here: 7 Day Belly Blast Diet

A fantastic method to discover how to burn off belly fat may be to recognize that sit-ups and ab crunches on their own are not that effective all on their own! You'll have to work out the entire body, and you are able to try this by integrating body weight exercises and strength training exercises within your workout routine. Furthermore, stomach crunches are known to tone your upper abdominals and leg raises are recognized to shape your lower abdominal muscles, so in case you do these with the correct nutrition and workout schedules, you will be fit very quickly!

Just Info Tips Around The World Headline

Exercise calorie counter

The first calorie counter shown below calculates how many calories you have burned depending on your weight and how many miles you have run. Health studies have shown that heavier people burn more calories when they are exercising, than lighter people. Hence the reason you need to type your current weight into the exercise calorie calculator below.
Your
Wgt(lbs)
Miles
run
Calories
burned
My Comment

Calorie Counter provided FREE by Hypergurl

MY FB'S FAN,LIKE ME PLEASE